The Sting

Greek folk music playing in the background ('Rembetico') and sounds of children playing. Sun shining. Women are outside talking and hanging out laundry in the intense morning heat.

A scream is heard and Eleni runs out of her home to find five year old Pambos crying and holding his finger tightly.

Neighbours rush to see what has caused the child to scream.

Eleni
Pambo mou ('my Pambos'), what’s happened? What is wrong? Are you hurt?

Pambos
[Holding out his red and enlarged finger.]

A bee stung me whilst I was playing.

Eleni
Let me see.

Pambos
I hate bees! They’re horrible!

Eleni
[Addressing one of the neighbours.]
Stasou can you bring me some meli (honey) from my kitchen?

Let's put some water and ice on it. We need to remove this little stinger and then all will be fine.

Pambos
But it hurts so much. Why did it have to sting me? I hate them.

Eleni
No. You must never hate anything. Bees are God's own creatures. They are very, very special.

[Stasou returns with a jar of honey and a large spoon. She hands them to Eleni with a smile.
Eleni scoops out a large portion of the honey from the jar and hands it to Pambos.]

Eleni
Is the honey nice, my brave boy?

Pambos
Yes, it’s lovely.

Eleni
Well, it is the bees that make this lovely, sweet syrup. Always remember that. How can you hate something that makes something so tasty and special when it is so tiny?

Pambos
But the sting still hurts mama.

Eleni
I know my darling but surely you can forgive a bee for playing with you a little bit when it gives us such a lovely food to enjoy every day?

Pambos
I suppose so.

Eleni
Just remember not to antagonise them and they will not bother you. Now go off and play.

Pambos
Can I have another spoonful?

Eleni and Stasou smile as Eleni fills another spoon.